“The Sports Timeline Posterbook” by “What on Earth?”

A few months fly by quickly… And suddenly you realize you have not posted in a while… Hopefully your summer was filled with lots of fun, sun and good books!

We developed a new ritual: Finja “reads” a book to me every night after we are done with our story time. At first, I was astonished how good she memorized books we didn’t read for a while. Sometimes she was able to reconstruct stories word for word! One of her favorites right now: “Leah’s mustache party” by Nadia Mike, a book we reviewed in July 2016. Can you guess why?

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We also discovered the biggest book we ever read: The “The What on Earth? Sports Timeline Posterbook”. The unassuming cover of the fold-out-book hides a 2-meter-long laminated timeline with more than 1,000 pictures of more than 100 different sports from the early Olympics to horseback riding, climbing and world records. The big format might not be handy for reading in bed, but it’s perfect to discover different sports and their history on a rainy afternoon!

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Recommended for children 7 to 14, the posterbook packs lots of knowledge for adults, too. Our preschooler immediately begun discovering the different sports and started her own “search, find and explain” game: “Mom, where is the person without a head. And why is he bleeding?” Luckily, we spend some time with explaining the different disciplines of horseback riding after that…

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The “What on Earth? Sports Timeline Posterbook” makes a stunning wall display and is perfect for (pre-)schools, playrooms and children’s rooms. The publisher “What on Earth?” offers different wall books, poster books and even sticker books about the history of nature, science, big history and Shakespeare. Unusual books and a perfect gift for curious minds every age!

More information:
The Sports Timeline Posterbook
by What on Earth?
ISBN: 978-0-9954820-7-4

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“A year in our new garden” by Gerda Muller

After my last postings and the longer downtime you might have realized that we just moved. Our new home does not only have more rooms than the previous townhome (including an office!), but also a big yard. Almost an acre, to be honest – an acre, that has to be mowed and cared for, but also promises lots of fun for Finja and us. Finja jumped in right away: Armed with kid-sized garden utensils she started to seed, plant and organize right away. She loves to feed the squirrels and already set up an insect hotel with rooms for hibernating lady bugs, butterflies and bees. And sure, we got tons of kids gardening books as presents from family and purchased some ourselves.

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While unpacking the moving boxes I also discovered a wonderful book in my review copy box – „A year in our new garden“ seems to be written especially for Finja! So we finally read the book tonight after watering the recently planted herbs.

A year in our new garden” by Gerda Muller was published by Floris Books. Floris books is the largest children’s book publisher in Scotland, producing international picture books, activity books and the Kelpies and Picture Kelpies ranges of Scottish children’s books. You might remember our review of „Thistle games“, „Harris the hero“, „Otto and the secret light of Christmas“ and „Little fairy makes a wish“. “A year in our new garden” was first published in 1988 under the German title “Ein Garten für die Kinder aus der Stadt” – “A yard for the children from the city”.

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The story: Anna and Benjamin just moved into a new home with their family. Although in the middle of a busy town, the house featured a beautiful, big garden. Although the garden is “a mess”, the family has plans to make the place beautiful: Their mom wants a patio, Benjamin wishes for little plot with lots of flowers and a pond, Anna dreams of a vegetable patch. Soon the family starts mowing, seeding, pulling weeds and planting. With some helpful hints from neighbors and friends Anna and Benjamin’s yard starts to grow and flourish. The family has a busy, interesting and motivating year in the new garden!

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“A year in our new garden” is not just a goodnight story. It offers children and adults the opportunity to learn about plans, gardening and the different kinds of flowers and gives practical tips how to sow seeds, planting flowers in the right season, crafting with chestnuts and acorns and spotting wildlife. And did you know that you can make a crown from leaves? The book is the perfect companion for children who love to discover nature year around. I can’t imagine a child who wouldn’t be ready for gardening after reading the delightful story!

Finja already loves “A year in our new garden”, recognized lots of plants, can’t wait for collecting acorns in fall and has plans for a little pond, too. It seems Gerda Muller’s book is just the right fit for her! In general I would recommend the book for preschool- and elementary aged children. With lots of things happening on every page Gerda Muller’s book is great for toddlers, too!

The timeless illustrations of “A year in our new garden” are just like the book designs I remember from my childhood. They are gentle, but full of detail – different from today’s picture books, but in a good way!

More information:
A year in our new garden
Written by Gerda Muller
Publisher: Floris Books
ISBN-13: 978-1782502593

„The Beeman“ by Laurie Krebs

Did you know that I was an official Barefoot Book Ambassador in 2016? As someone who constantly has her nose in a book, promoting literacy and working with the great Barefoot community was the perfect fit! Well, that being said – I quickly discovered that direct marketing isn’t for me. A year later I still love Barefoot books and miss the discounts I got as an Ambassador. That doesn’t change that I’m not a seller, so I keep on reading and reviewing.

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Imagine my delight when I was offered review copies of the newest Barefoot books by one of the literacy agencies I’m working with! Sure, I said yes – and quickly re-discovered my love for Barefoot Books. Is there something better than unconventional, diverse children’s literature? Finja chose the first two books to read and review. One of them: “The Beeman” by Laurie Krebs, illustrated by Valeria Cis. “The Beeman” is one of the wonderful non-fiction books that teaches children about the real world and score with delightful pictures, an attention-grabbing storyline and rhymes.

Do you know where our honey comes from? Bees not only provide us with honey, their work as pollinator is important for our environment – but bees are critically endangered. “The Beeman” teaches little ones about bees, a bee man’s everyday life and why bees are neither scary nor dangerous, but important for our environment.

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The story: Grandpa, the bee-man, teaches his young grandson the basics of beekeeping. His relationships to his bees is one of friendship and respect. They are family. We discover the boxes where bees live and sleep – the “beehive”. We learn about different kinds of bees and their duties: What are worker bees for, how do you recognize drone bees and why is the queen so important for a bee colony? Did you know that the house bees dry up the nectar brought by worker bees to make honey? How will the bees survive in winter and how does the honey get from the honey comb into the bottle? Author Laurie Krebs wrote her rhyming story easy to understand, several pages of endnotes full of essential facts about bees and beekeeping are perfect for children and parents that have more questions. The recipe for “Grandma’s Apple and Honey Muffins” is a tasty activity for hungry readers.

I re-discovered my love for non-fiction when Finja started to ask questions about our world. “The Beeman” is one of the books I love for my preschool-aged daughter: Easy to understand and awakening curiosity. She’s able to discover “The Beeman” by herself, even if she’s not able to read yet. The illustrations by Valeria Cis are colorful and grasp her attention, but they are also true to fact. The publisher recommends “The Beeman” for age 5 to 9, in my opinion the book is already perfect for preschool aged children.

A wonderful book for curious children (and parents)!

“The Beeman”
Written By: Laurie Krebs
Illustrated By: Valeria Cis
Publisher: Barefoot Books
ISBN-13: 978-1846862601

„Hello World“ by Jonathan Litton

“Hello” might be just a little word. But it starts relationships. A friendly “Hello” opens doors. A “Hello” brings smiles. The book Hello World – A celebration of languages and curiosities” picks up the significance of this small word. The concept of this book is simple, but it’s message is complex: The world has over 7000 languages, all of them alive and changing every day. At the end of this century half of them will be lost. “Learn the small languages as well as the big ones, and keep these languages alive.” This message on the last page of “Hello World” was most impressive for me as a parent. Did you know that a language is lost every 14 days?

"Hello World" by Jonathan Litton

That’s why it’s so important to teach our children about language and culture. “Hello World” makes a beginning, the book shows preschool and elementary school aged children how much fun learning a new language can be. And there is a lot to learn with the over 140 languages shown in this book! Sturdy pages with colorful maps of each continent teach about the “Hello” in different languages and the numbers of speakers – including “Hello” in Native American Hand Talk and American Sign Language. Multiple flaps with pages of each continent invite to linger, browse and discover. Especially fascinating: Trivia about each continent, like the Incan civilization, the different languages in West Africa and the Egyptian hieroglyphs. Or maybe you want to try the unspoken Maori greeting gesture “hongi”? Finally, readers learn to say “Goodbye” in different languages.

"Hello World", published by 360 degrees

Hello World” introduces children to foreign cultures, celebrates diversity and makes learning global languages fun. Finja started exploring immediately and although she can’t read yet she had lots of fun asking about each continent or country and finding “America, far away from Germany”. According to the publisher “Hello World” is intended for children 8-12 years, but I found it fascinating for preschoolers, too.

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Multiple flaps make learning fun!

This book was published by “360 degrees”, an imprint by Little Tiger Press. According to the publisher’s homepage “there is great value to be had in pausing for a fresh look at your surroundings. 360 Degrees illuminates a multitude of curiosities, from the inner workings of a spacesuit to the physiology of a penguin, and from the life-cycle of lemmings to the intricacies of Chinese characters. From the everyday to the extraordinary, our authors and illustrators have crafted interactive books to intrigue and delight.” This is definitely something we could see when exploring “Hello World”! We recently reviewed “Things that grow” from the same publisher.

"Hello World" by Jonathan Litton

„Hello World“
written by Jonathan Litton
illustrated by Cartographik L’Atelier
Publisher: 360 Degrees
ISBN-13: 978-1944530006

„Things that grow“ by Libby Walden

The older Finja gets (or maybe, the older I get 😀 ) the more we enjoy exploring nonfiction-books. Finja is a curious child and there probably wasn’t a day without at least two-hundred-forty-five “whys” in months. She wants to know everything and sometimes comes up with really weird questions: How do the bones get into a body? Are stuffed animals born from other stuffed animals? Which part of an animal does meat come from? Why do plants need sunlight? When she’s not satisfied with my answer she’s searching for one herself, which sometimes can be a little confusing. Did you know that this little girl is convinced her favorite mac and cheese with a bunny on the package are made from bunny meat? Yes, I know…

"Things that grow" by Libby Walden

Maybe you remember me mentioning the German “Wieso? Weshalb? Warum” book series from Ravensburger. By now Finja has almost every book out of this series and she still enjoys reading it again and again. Anyway, every book is made in a similar matter so I was searching for other science books for kids. There is not a lot of educational material for preschool age children on the market, especially when it comes to more abstract topics like genetics or the cycle of life. I still have some books from university at home, but there are hardly appropriate for a four-year-old…

My question was answered when we received a review copy of “Things that grow” from Libby Walden, published by 360 Degrees. 360 Degrees is a new imprint of Little Tiger Group. The description of 360 Degrees is more than promising: “360 Degrees illuminates a multitude of curiosities, from the inner workings of a spacesuit to the physiology of a penguin, and from the life-cycle of lemmings to the intricacies of Chinese characters.” So, exactly what we were searching for!

"Things that grow" by Libby Walden

The format of “Things that grow” is unusual for a biology book for children. The rather small volume fits in the hand of preschoolers and elementary school children. The accurate, but still artistic illustrations by Becca Stadtlander made our daughter curious for more. That is, more information about basically everything in our world…

“Things that grow” describes the world around us from a seed to a tree, the development of the animal kingdom including the “missing link” and the evolution of man and finishes with a quick description of our universe, including the “big bang” and the ever-changing surface of our planet earth. The book offers a lot, from facts to little crafts like growing cress in an egg shell.

"Things that grow" by Libby Walden

The language is not too bloomy, but matter-of-fact and accurately. Finja might not have been able to grasp the meaning of each chapter without additional explanations. For us this was not a problem at all, as we enjoyed the journey together – “Things that grow” had something for both of us. I still would recommend “Things that grow” more for elementary school children than preschoolers – the recommended age range according to the publisher is 7 to 10.

"Things that grow" by Libby Walden

Author Libby Walden is an editor at Caterpillar Books. You can find more information about her on her blog “Through the wardrobe”, which is partly inspired by one of her favorite children’s books, “the supremely brilliant The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe”.

More information:
“Things that grow”
written by Libby Walden
illustrated by Becca Stadtlander
Hardcover: 62 pages
Publisher: 360 Degrees
ISBN: 978-1944530051

„The wolves return“ by Celia Godkin

When the first settlers set foot on American soil, they encountered wolves everywhere. But due to hunting and habitat changes there were hardly any wolves left by the middle of the 20th century… 1978, the wolves were listed as a threatened species in forty-eight states. In 1995 thirteen wolves from Canada were released on the Yellowstone National Park. The following year another ten wolves followed. The experiment was a success with now over hundred wolves living in Yellowstone. But, even more important: The wolves play an important role for the health of other species and the balance of the ecosystem.

"The wolves return" by Celia Godkin, Pajama Press

“The wolves return” by Celia Godkin, biologist and associate professor at the University of Toronto as well as award-winning author and illustrator, explains the journey of reintroducing wild wolves to Yellowstone and the consecutive changes in the environments of the park in kid-friendly words.

Wolves had been extinct in Yellowstone for a long time and the return of the big carnivores has a huge effect on the local wildlife, which in return changes the environment and local wildlife: As wolves primarily prey on weak elks, they keep the herds smaller, but healthier. The elks move from the bottom of the valley to the higher areas with more trees for shelter, which gives the seedlings which were previously eaten by elks the chance to grow. Within years, the valley changes to a wooden area with tall trees. Beavers use this trees to build dams and beaver houses to raise families. Beaver ponds are a home for waterfowl and fish, which in return attract ospreys and otter. Berry bushes are growing back and provide food and shelter for birds, insects and bears. Fewer elk also let bison herds increase in size. But wolves not only control the number of elks. As huge predators, the coyotes leave Yellowstone. They prey now becomes food for hawks, weasels, badgers and foxes… After almost 20 years the return of a few wolves changed the face of Yellowstone National Park forever. Would you have guessed that a single species can have such a high impact?
"The wolves return" by Celia Godkin, Pajama Press

 

Ecology is a complex topic, but Celia Godkin does a great job with explaining biological correlations to children from preschool to middle school age. Her texts are easy to understand, without complicated technical terms or terminology. What wakes the love for nature are her artwork: True-to-life pencil and watercolor illustrations capture the attention of children and adults from the first page on. It’s hard for an expert to explain scientific topics in easy words and almost impossible to find the right words suitable and plausible for children. Celia Godkin does an expert job! The appendix of the book gives a short overview of the history of wolves in the US and is a great add on for older children, teacher and parents.

Our daughter loved “The wolves return”. She is interested in nature in general and loves wolves – she wants to convince me that our local coyotes are “just baby wolves” each time we spot one… It was really enjoyable to teach her about one of her favorite animals and the development of an ecosystem within a short time span. I studied biology at university and am acquainted with the basics of ecology, although it never was my specialty. I didn’t even know of the return of the wolves to Yellowstone and had a great time researching the topic. We will follow on this topic tomorrow as I found some interesting videos and materials online… I can just guess what a great resource this book is for homeschooling parents or teachers! The publisher also provides a teaching guide, which was unfortunately not online yet at time of this review.

"The wolves return" by Celia Godkin, Pajama Press

Long story short: “The wolves return” is a great non-fiction book with an environmental message for children every age. It’s a great way to raise children who love nature and are sensible to the ecological problems. “The wolves return” is another wonderful children’s book by Pajama Press, an independent publisher from Canada.

More information:

“The wolves return”
by Celia Godkin
Hardcover: 32 pages
Publisher: Pajama Press
ISBN-13: 978-1772780116